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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
to create a moral equivalency. i think a ground war is obviously going to test where is egypt, where is turkey. we know where iran is. they are arming the hamas, missiles or a lot of them seem to come out of iran. in essence, it seems to me that something pro joked by iran and encouraged by egypt and turkey by immediately taking the side of hamas which is extraordinary. >> greta: so, with hamas in order to get them to step down from its firing rockets into israel and doing provocative, take at hamas. why in the world they are going reach with truce. they are consumed with hatred toward israel. they were very tight and close to iran. today they identified six people who they felt were conspiring with the israelis. they executed them and dragged one body through the streets. they used civilians as shields. where in the world is if i do strike a temporary deal, why in the world would you ever think it would stick or hold? >> you would have to be totally unrealistic. the secretary-general's comments everybody should show restraint is absurd. if somebody lobbed 130 bombs on new york we wo
crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked o
in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. howe
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted their sources but also hearing seniors, including the arab league, suggests that leadership of various countries and organizations are coming to the region for an announcement which the vetting is that this evening hillary clinton will be meeting israeli prime minister and the betting is at that time the ceas
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
saw this massive push in this really indigenous push within egypt, tunisia, and other democratic governments. some of those movements have had potentially scary things. there are some islamic fundamentalist parties that we do not have great relationships with and they understand that can be confusing thing. what obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolv
years. you've had dramatic circumstances in egypt and libya and tunisia. they're working on syria. you could point to examples in borrow ran, for example, that's not moving as fast. part of the obama philosophy is very -- which is very interesting is trying to find what is possible in this area that does not get america caught in the trap of unnecessary war, repetition of quagmire. you have two examples of egypt and libya which are most striking. people on the streets clear my opposition to the dictator there. there are plenty of examples, for example, bush in tan man square. -- ton man square. -- tiananmen square. there's lots of examples where we tell folks -- bush sr. and iraq telling saddam if you want to crack down the shia, so be it . and because of that factor, that's one of the key factors that got them pushed out. libya was a different story where you have the possibility of a massacre occurring and obama said i would like to stop that from happening, very much so. but if i can't get a true blue international coalition through the u.n., then i might not do it. >> how about a t
. >> that quartet comprises opponents of the regime. egypt and saudi arabia, as well as syrians ally, iran. calls for dialogue are in directly aimed at the syrian opposition which is meeting to search for greater unity. the national council and opponents within syria itself. hear, the groups under pressure from united states are seeking compromise. >> we will find a way to choose -- they will find a way to choose their leadership. in this case, the owhole world will be behind them. >> there are concerned about losing their influence. still, the hope to come to an agreement with other opposition groups by thursday. the goal, to form one body that would gain recognition in the international community. >> well, the former head of the aerospace is recommending that france used shock therapy to get out of its current economic crisis. >> his proposals include cutting 30 billion euros from payroll taxes, relaxing labor laws, and reducing the sales tax. it was suggested to boost competitiveness. it is said that the measures are too expensive. the french president has promised to make what he calls a stro
and israel exchanged rocket and shell fire. in november 13, is real and hamas said messages via egypt indicating interest in a truce, but then it degraded from there. at the question is whether egypt can play a role, or the united states which has sent hillary clinton, can play a role. the israelis debate a ground invasion of your reporting from gaza city, the olive orchards, they lied to enter the border. monday the area was a virtual no mans land. hundreds of families have fled. it says that gazana are not the only ones encouraged about a ground invasion. talks in cairo, continue in cairo. let us hear from on next call, terry in maryland, on our line for republicans. caller: america has no real influence in the middle east. i say that because we have been trying to negotiate this cents ronald reagan. and if we had any influence with the arab-speaking population, we basically would have succeeded by now. the reality is, for half of the countries, we are nothing more than ana tm, and the other half, -- we are nothing more nothingan atm and for the others we are nothing more than an an
as the cia director. >>> in egypt today one man is dead after violent clashes with police. protesters are camping out in cairo's tahrir square. in a scene strikingly similar to what we saw in the revolution almost two years ago, the demonstrators are voicing their anger with president mohamed morsi after what some are calling an unprecedented power grab. cnn's reza sayah is joining us from cairo once again. reza, we're hearing about attacks against several muslim brotherhood offices in egypt. what do you know about that? >> reporter: according to the brotherhood spokesperson, two of their offices were attacked by anti-morsi protesters. the brotherhood says the protesters were carrying molotov cocktails, clubs and knives and destroyed and heavily damaged these offices. remember, muslim brotherhood had called for a one-million-man demonstration of their own today to rival the opposition's demonstrations. late last night they called it off to avoid violence. but in these two particular cities north of cairo, they didn't avoid violence. >> reza, we're also seeing and i want to show our vi
of israel" that egypt can affect and lead the process of building democratic and constitutional regime that will become a dream for african and southern hemisphere. the group wants to make shariah law main source of the constitution. election is in the books but some d.c. voters might have mistakenly shown up to vote today. local media reports say tuesday morning nearly 2,000 district voters receive democratic robo calls telling them to vote tomorrow. as in wednesday. the democratic party says the foul-up happened because a vendor recycled a message from the day before. the party says the call was rerecorded and the entire list of 100,000 infrequent or new d.c. voters were recalled and urged to vote tuesday instead. >>> election day in america is viewed with considerable interest around the world. senior foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg shows us from london. >> mr. speaker, the house will join me in congratulating president obama on the election victory. >> europeans overwhelmingly wanted to see president obama return to the white house. the special edition of the front page s
but egypt and possibly beyond. jenna: let's focus on syria. this conflict has been going on for 19 months. woe just heard news that the opposition group there elected a leader, a christian, the second-in-command being a member of the muslim brotherhood. we keep hearing that the opposition forces are very amorphous, we can't side with them because they don't know who they are. how do we interrupt the forces if they are keith a network and are at work in this region? >> jenna, very interesting we moved from we don't know who they are to we very well know who they are at this time. the central force and opposition is the muslim brotherhood. there is consensus among the region and observe. >> the number two of the new group, is a number two of the muslim brotherhood in syria. the chief, the new president of the council is indeed a christian. he is secular. he has been very liberal. he will oppose the muslim brotherhood. the problem, jenna, he doesn't have influence. those who control the ground are islamist militias. those who control most of the institutions are muslim brotherhood. you have
, and you could save hundreds. liberty mutual insurance -- responsibility. what's your policy? >>> egypt passes a new draft constitution, but that doesn't mean the country's crisis is over. lisa sylvester's monitor thag and some of the other top stories in "the situation room" right now. lisa, what do you have? >> hi there, joe. hundreds of egyptians gathered for prayer in tahrir square today, protesters vowed to return to the streets. this after an assembly led by muslim brotherhood members passed a new constitution to replace the one scrapped in last year's revolution. it still must be approved by egyptian citizens, many of whom are angry at the government at what they consider to be a power grabby president mohamed morsi. and in new jersey a train car carrying highly toxic chemicals crashed into a creek near the delaware river early this morning. it happened after a bridge collapsed. the area was evacuated. and more than 18 people were treated for respiratory issues and exposure to leaking vinyl chloride. it's a known cancer-causing chemical that can cause headaches and dizziness. >>>
. that's going to be a big challenge. host ks what's next for egypt? guest: in terms of? host: in terms of its leadership. egypt, the other nation that you mentioned. guest: i think the big push forward in egypt right now is to establish some of the legitimatecy of democratic governance there. it was a rocky transition, certainly. after the incredibly uplifting moments in the square. it's devolved into a long and protracted conflict between the military, the muzz lem brotherhood, some secular parties, and there still isn't a clear governmental structure there. for the egyptians, i think, internally, it is -- >> watch "washington journal" daily at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. we take you back live to the house as members return for two recorded votes. the bill h.r. 6156, to authorize the extension of nondiscriminatory treatment, normal trade relations treatment to products of the russian federation and require reports on the compliance of the russian federation with obligations as a member of the world trade organizations and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the h
interest. you take a look at egypt. under the original peace plan, we give tremendous amount of foreign aid to egypt. right now egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arabs spring. we have to rethink the dollars we're spending the egypt. we have to say these dollars are for maintaining a security and a piece. if you are not participating, you do not get them. we have to continue our commitment in foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally. it is our sister country. we need to do everything we can to fulfil our commitment. the military aides we still is a real is that right here in america. when you look at the arab spring, there was a lot of hope that this would be continuing democracy, and we're falling into what has become not secular governments, but religious governments, and we need to be gathering up all of our allies and be making a firm statement that this region needs to be statement -- stabilized. we need to protect the people who serve and our state departments, not in all facets, whether ngo's the state department. it cannot procu
behind palestinianian civilians. but the government in egypt, which was backed by the administration, has condemned israel, not hamas. the terrorist group hamas doesn't want peace with israel. it wants war. it kills israeli citizens and then hides behinds the skirts of palestinian women. israel has the moral right and duty to defend itself from the bar barrack hamas. the united states should be in total support of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader be
proactive and extending aid to egypt before and after morsi was elected, and i think it's important to understand what sort of things egypt needed right away was an ability to sell government bonds and treasury bills were because it takes about 14% interest which is pretty high for a government come and immediate deaths things look terrible. they came in and said okay. we will buy your one month issue of bills. a good payment unless the government defaults on everything. but that has helped relieve some of the interest pressure and try to move egypt out of the debt trap than greece or italy or spain. the second thing they have done is like the development bank there's quite good development banks that help identify the investment projects, make sure they are built without corruption and that they become effective. i think it is $4.5 billion that were qatar and saudi arabia have and christine was out there in september and they were working on a long program, very low interest rate and there would be another four and a half million or so but then egypt has a fighting chance to get an
the word egypt and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on every time that we search for something on our laptop we are not only gathering information, we are giving information about what we buy about what we find interesting, about what we like it, perhaps with our political biases may be said that in theory a search engine would be giving me objective information and you and i ought to get the same information if we tied in the same word, not so anymore. that's kind of scary. >> because somebody is making up in their mind as to what it is that we want. >> it is a series. it is the computer. what is the word i'm looking for all or a -- algorithm. thank you. >> algorithm is fine, and by understand that it exists, and i respect and i will salute it. it's there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers something? who is going to go out and cover the war? who is going to cover the campaign? without the journalist being there doing the abc information gathering, honest information gathering,
in september to carry out attack in tunisia and egypt and yephen well size libya. much of the focused on benghazi alone. these three embassy assaults deserve scut ninny and they are all connected to the al-qaida-led network. senator carl levin said it is not fair to hold her responsible for the original talking points since she did not produce them and the intelligence community stood by them. >> gretchen: there is no shock there. democrats will support susan rice. >> brian: i was stunned by yesterday. >> gretchen: this entire thing is a political football. this is what it is all about and i would add to the equation do we also have the f.b.i. and the secretary of defense and the director of the cia potentially playing that political football game? that would be a huge problem if it were more than just politics. mr. 1: they play hard ball in washington on everything . and unfortunately for susan rice her charm offensive back fire wanted to make nice and made things worse and here is the problem for her going forward. if the administration places her name in confirmation. senators grah
. they left san diego in may far seven month deployment. >>> egypt christian church has a new pope. the boy wearing a blindfold chose the name of the new pay tree arch from a crystal chalice. the new pope will be the new leader. they have long complained of discrimination from muslim majority. >>> the world's largest race was supposed to be held today in new york city, but mayor bloomberg canceled it so all city resources can be used toward sandy relief. as reporter matt tells us some of the tens of thousands of runners wished that decision could have come a bit sooner. >> reporter: italian running team pauses for a picture with the new york city marathon canceled they want to volunteer to help storm victims. >> we tried to do our best. we asked the possibility to help the people in new jersey and the island. and we are available. >> reporter: about 40,000 runners were already in the city when the race was called off. chuck ferguson and his friends wore their race number. they qualified for the race by raising money for the leukemia and lymphoma society. >> obviously it's disappointing. i d
between egypt and yemen. i think we know that saudi arabia had mixed feelings about how quickly mubarak was dumped, and -- but they also, the saudis playeded a crucial role of easing yemen. it was not easy. it was slow. it was bloody, but compared to the other changes, it was not that bad. in april of to 20* -- 2011, just as the arab spring was in full bloom, if you will, the c7 finance ministers met in france and formed a partnership with the vision that was simple that europe had been through this kind of thing before. after eastern europe broke away
, and they simply typed into the search engine the word egypt. and they got totally different responses. why? because there is that process going on, every time that we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gather information, we are getting information. we're getting information about what we buy, about what we find interesting, about what we like, about perhaps what our political biases may be, so that in theory a search engine that ought to be giving me objective information, and you and i ought to get the same information if we type in the same word, not so anymore. that's kind of scary. >> because somebody is making up his or her mind as to what it is that we want. >> it's not somebody. it is, it is a series of zeros and ones. it's a series of, it is the computer, what is the word i'm looking for? [laughter] algorithm, thank you. [laughter] it is the algorithm which is -- >> algorithm is defined, understand it exists, and i respected and i will salute it. it so there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism? who gets up in the morning and covers somet
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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